Category: Technology

Grid Technology

They had a advertisement about their smart grid technology at the super bowl. They have their advertisements on you tube. Why are they advertising to people who I don't think can place their dollar vote on such technologies. Well, I have your answer right here. To gain Govt. Bailout Money when they fail. They are planting seeds that they are a must keep company–My Broker tried to get me to buy them when they fell below 50, then 40, then 30. . Now that GE is under 10, that Broker does not call anymore but I have been calling him asking if it is now OK to buy GE since he has wanted me to buy it for the past 40 dollars per share–he does not answer that question. As with most brokers, he has no clue what drives a market. I have been trading more years than he has been alive and know what all markets know–Socialism kills Capitalism—the bloodletting is not over.

GTC: Bringing graphics-rich virtual desktops and applications to public clouds, the VMware Horizon DaaS platform with NVIDIA GRID technology was introduced b. . .


Drone Technology

I read that the laws of war are vague in relation to drone combatants, can someone please explain to me why the use of drones is controversial. Well, I have your answer right here. It's all about policy considerations. For example, the US is using drones in Iraq and Afghanistan (and elsewhere) because it keeps human combatants out of harms way and in a culture of preserving life (which the US has) we value human life over any monetary loss we incur from the destruction of our drones (which are very expensive pieces of technology). I would imagine that most people would agree with the benefits of using drones over humans if the goals can still effectively be accomplished. So what can be bad about using drones? Consider this, during the Cold War, an all out war was avoided because of the seemingly crazy policy of MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction). Simply put, neither side wanted to start a war with the other because both were capable of totally destroying the other and if you started the war to destroy the other country you were assured that your country would be completely destroyed as well. During the Cold War era, the US and USSR did not agree on many things but one thing that they did agree on was a treaty that stated neither country would develop missile defenses. Why would they agree to limit themselves when this type of technology would be so must have beneficial to either side? It was because the benefit of the technology would be so advantageous to the side that developed it first that the leaders of both countries feared the side that developed it first would launch a preemptive strike against the other during the small window of advantage that they held over the other. In other words, the country with the missile defense advantages would not have been assured a mutual destruction and they would be able to theoretically win if war broke out between the two. Therefore, they agreed to limit the development of the technology in the hopes that MAD would prevent all out war between the two countries. Sounds crazy, doesn't it? Yeah, it does but crazy or not MAD is given much credit in preventing World War3. Missile defenses are still controversial to this day. Russia was all up in arms and took action against the US when George Bush signed a treaty with Turkey to put missile defenses in the country. Publicly they said it was to thwart a threat from Iran but Russia took the most offense to this move. Some observers even say Russia's military invasion of Georgia (a US ally on Russia's border) was in response to the move. What does all this have to do with the drone controversy? Using drones in war are controversial for the same reason that missile defenses continue to be controversial. Many observers believe drone present an unfair advantage on the battle field that they fear will lead to an increase in wars and conflicts. Especially concerned are those countries that do not have the technology to develop drones. They are very concerned that a country like the US will be more likely to use military actions against them in place of diplomatic actions because the use of drones is a low risk form of the show of force. For example, consider Libya, no US ground troops were deployed in backing the uprising in Libya. NATO only used air and sea forces to attack certain targets of the Libyan government. Those who wish to ban or limit the use of drones in war fear that their use increases the plausibility and acceptability of using force in lieu of other channels of dispute resolution. As technology progresses and drones start to possess greater war waging abilities, critics believe this will only exacerbate the possibility of war. I know this is not the easiest subject to comprehend and the international relations theories are not all discussed here but I hope this helps to shed any light on why the use of drones in war (a seemingly innocuous subject) is controversial. It is a great question that we as a society will have address sometime in the near future and I am pleased you brought up this conversation.

Stratfor Military Analyst Paul Floyd examines drone proliferation around the globe and explains the technology's constraints and potential. For more analysis. . .


Mems Technology

Anyone knows what the MEMs technology is all about ?? How it work. How it's made?????/. What I found out was – *Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) (also written as micro-electro-mechanical, MicroElectroMechanical or microelectronic and microelectromechanical systems) is the technology of very small mechanical devices driven by electricity; it merges at the nano-scale into nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and nanotechnology. MEMS are also referred to as micromachines (in Japan), or Micro Systems Technology – MST (in Europe). MEMS are separate and distinct from the hypothetical vision of molecular nanotechnology or molecular electronics. MEMS are made up of components between 1 to 100 micrometres in size (i. E. 0. 001 to 0. 1 mm) and MEMS devices generally range in size from 20 micrometres (20 millionths of a metre) to a millimetre. They mostly consist of a central unit that processes data, the microprocessor and several components that interact with the outside such as microsensors. At these size scales, the standard constructs of classical physics are not always useful. Because of the large surface area to volume ratio of MEMS, surface effects such as electrostatics and wetting dominate volume effects such as inertia or thermal mass. The potential of very small machines was appreciated before the technology existed that could make themsee, for example, Richard Feynman's famous 1959 lecture There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom. MEMS became practical once they could be fabricated using modified semiconductor device fabrication technologies, normally used to make electronics. These include molding and plating, wet etching (KOH, TMAH) and dry etching (RIE and DRIE), electro discharge machining (EDM), and other technologies capable of manufacturing small devices. An early example of a MEMS device is the resonistor an electromechanical monolithic resonator. MEMS basic processes: Deposition processes: One of the basic building blocks in MEMS processing is the ability to deposit thin films of material with a thickness anywhere between a few nanometres to about 100 micrometres. Patterning: Patterning in MEMS is the transfer of a pattern into a material. Etching processes: There are two basic categories of etching processes: Wet etching and dry etching. In the former, the material is dissolved when immersed in a chemical solution. In the latter, the material is sputtered or dissolved using reactive ions or a vapor phase etchant for a somewhat dated overview of MEMS etching technologies.

DigInfo – MEMS, the nanotechnology which is currently taking the world by storm, has been the focus of Ritsumeikan University for a w. . .


Ips Technology

Or its not that much different. . I want to buy a tablet, and the choice lies between these two similar tablets. . They both have almost same specification, the only difference is the first one have screen with ips technology but not sim card slot, although the other is the opposite, it have a sim card slot but without ips techonlogy. . Thanks for the answer. Basically… Although I'm talking about computer monitors, the same should apply for tablets. My previous monitor was a standard 21" LCD/led-backlight one with a resolution of 1440 x 900. My current one is an 27" IPS panel with a resolution of 2560 x 1440. The most obvious difference (besides screen size ) was the viewing angle of the IPS panel. The viewing angle compared to my previous monitor is remarkably different allowing me to view my IPS monitor practically sideways compared to my old one. Another difference I realized was it had more "vibrant" colors and it displayed the colors much more clearer, if that makes sense. The only downside about the IPS panels is they usually have a slower response time. But this shouldn't be noticeable at all compared to the other one, as I've yet to see a difference in response time compared to my other monitor and this is coming from an avid gamer who plays a lot of fast paced games. Pros – Much wider viewing angle (should make it easier on the neck), more vibrant colors Cons – A slower response time, but should not be noticeable.

Here's what IPS technology expert, Bruce Berkoff (Chairman of the LCD TV Association) says about LG's amazing IPS display technology. Your LG Optimus 4X HD's. . .


Technology Inventions

What were any of the inventions of the Israelites? There technology? Inventions of ANCIENT Israelites, Hebrews. From what I can tell… No significant technological inventions. But the moral code they had invented (derived from their religion) became the basis of many different societies around the globe. Surprisingly enough, many of those societies became very comfortable places for rapid technological growth from 8th to 10th century (Muslim societies) and then continued from 10th to 21st centuries (Christian societies). Jews and recent converts from Judaism had made major contributions to the technological progress of those two civilizations. Conclusion: Hebrew civilization had no direct impact on technological progress, but indispensable nevertheless. ADDED: In the time of ancient Hebrew kingdoms Babylonians and Greeks were major inventors in the field of technology in the West (Chinese made their own progress in the East). But both inventing civilizations were swamped very early by their moral code and religious traditions. Babylonians went into fatalism and mysticism and technology is a boring subject for mystics. Greeks considered it very denigrating for a free person to do something by hands and free Greeks had no incentive to make work easier. Any problems with production were always solved by assigning more slaves to do the work.

Ashoka-Lemelson Fellow Hilmi Quraishi, Ashoka's CIO Romanus Berg and Microsoft's Unlimited Potential Group partner to exchange knowledge, scale Hilmi's mobil. . .


Fuel Cell Technology

Do you guys think the big shots of the oil industry will allow themselves to lose their billions to a better option that can help the ecosystem and the economy . Essentially — Fuel cells to power vehicles is quite new. And so today there are about 300 new buses powered by fuel cells. In five years there is expected to be 4000. This year Walmart has purchased 600 fork lift trucks powered by fuel cells and expect the payback to be less than three years. By 2015 it is estimated 5000 taxicabs powered by fuel cells will be operating in the US. By 2015 both Toyota and Nissan will be offering cars powered by Fuel cells. And so today there are about 65 service locations in the US offering hydrogen to refuel the fuel cells. By 2015 there is planned to be over 2000 stations. The range of a car powered by fuel cells can be easily 400 miles. By 2015 all major Walmart centers, Coco Cola bottling plants will be receiving all their electricity from fuel cell generators on their property. Presently Amazon, EBay, university of Tennessee, are generating enough electricity for their corporate use to power a small city. It is estimated that by 2018 commercial fuel cells in the US will be generating enough electricity to power New York City. By 2020 ninety per cent of all taxi cabs in New York City will be powered by fuel cells.

Toyota brought us out to CES 2014 so that we could see what they're up to in fuel cell technology. To our general pleasure, we found that fuel cells aren't j. . .